Looking In

The three images I want to look at in this post were in the same portfolio as the Kraken image I posted the other day. At the time I came across them, I felt they offered a calm respite from the internal shite that was threatening to keep me off-balance. The view through each of the windows provide only tiny pieces of information, and certainly not enough to draw any concrete conclusions. Old bones and bandages have both been recurring themes in the past; as have windows, although more often than not I notice the pictures which have a solitary figure who sits in a room with menacing weirdos looking in from the outside. I’m sat here wondering if the attraction is related to a real shift in perspective; that I was trying to disengage from the personal and get back to being objective.

 Lana Tustich

Lana Tustich

The first image, shown above, is quiet and appears to offer a sense of contemplation, a moment of calm. Skulls replacing a human head could be an indicator of old preconditioned thoughts, ones which have been present since before conscious memory. Bones are already with us at birth and represent the stuff which makes up our basic framework and act not only as support but provide protection for the vital organs. There’s an indication of a hidden meaning which says there has been a time of being mentally confined by old thoughts; the skull looks almost prehistoric like it could belong to a dinosaur. Other visible objects include a butterfly and a snake, both symbols of transformation ~ the snake with its regular shedding of its skin and the butterfly with its metamorphosis. These objects suggest that any changes occurring are completely natural and part of a growth cycle. Despite the picture giving off the impression of stillness, it’s also suggesting that there will be a change in how something looks; I’m wondering if it’s the ‘body’ of something which will undergo the change, yet the dinosaur skull head is saying that ways of thinking may remain the same. The symbolic message may well be a reminder that even when we have to deal with change, we still have those old thoughts, or more likely memories, which will stay the same. Whatever is going on, it doesn’t alter the fact of what is already known, and if we feel restricted we might need to remember that it could be serving a valuable purpose.

 Lana Tustich

Lana Tustich

The woman in the picture above - I can’t make out if she’s floating or hanging. I’m inclined to see her as hung, but that’s probably the current state of my mind more than anything else. There’s also the possibility that she’s standing in a very relaxed manner. It’s the position of her hands and how she holds them which has me questioning what’s going on. The paper birds create a sense of lightness and are more likely to back up the idea that the woman is simply standing. Like the first image, there’s a sense of quiet, but if anything I get a stronger sense of isolation with this one although I’m not entirely sure why.

 

Lana Tustich

The final image is probably the clearest of them all because the face is visible. The woman in bandages tells me it’s a period of healing which could be nearly complete. If you feel drawn to pictures such as this, it’s possible you’ve been through the ringer and had a need to take some time out to recover.  I’m a little intrigued with the skull which sits to one side and wonder if it could represent someone else’s ideas which have been helpful to the recovery process, a case of being able to use the perspective or thoughts of another during a time of vulnerability?

One thought which comes to mind is how each of these three pictures reflects reality; that when we’re on the outside looking in, we don’t know anything other than what we see. What we see has to be kept in context of how it’s framed, and it’s impossible to see beyond what is shown even if you know there’s more going on. But what about you? What kind of window pics do you like? Are you looking out, or are you looking in? Is the glass clean or is it broken? Do you find it easy to make assumptions about the things you can’t see? Do you lean towards the positive or negative in your analysis? Can you see any correlation between your interpretation and your current perspective?

Thanks again to the creative efforts of Lana Tustich. You can see her work in greater detail here along with the rest of her portfolio.